Superfreakonomics – The journey continues

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After leaving university I made a vow never to read books again.  Well, Robert Ludlum screwed it up for me with his amazing thrillers and sense of humour.  I have also been on a sort of personal journey of self-improvement so titles like Master Key to Riches and How to win Friends and Influence People also find a place on my bookshelf.

Then a year ago I spied a book on my sister’s bookshelf: Freakonomics.  I thought that if my sister, a non-intellectual yet a very passionate person has this on her bookshelf, then I must take a look at it.  (Mind you I loved economics in school but didn’t have the mathematical chops to finish studying it in school.  And the cover looked cool!)  Now it’s on my bookshelf along with the follow-up: Superfreakonomics.

I follow and read up on the Freakonomics blog, so I am now used to the whimsical and humourous takes they have on life and the many decisions people make on everything from what cities people live in and why people cheat.  Therefore, I was prepared to read up on their explanations on topics such as the historical analysis on why women become prostitutes.

It would be unfair of me to pretend to do a proper report on the book.  It will be both too short and not scholastic enough.  So I won’t even try.

However, I was really impressed with the thought and effort they put into discussing two specific topics:  How to easily, and in an affordable manner, curb the ravage effects of hurricanes and how to simply slow down and reverse global warming.

So, who should read this book?  Everyone.  Why?  Because it answers the basic question that we all scratch our heads over – Why do people do what they do?

If you’ve read it, I’d love to hear your thoughts?  What book are you reading right now?
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3 thoughts on “Superfreakonomics – The journey continues

    g said:
    December 1, 2009 at 4:48 pm

    I am so looking forward to Superfreakonomics. It's next on my Audible list after I finish Brogan's Trust Agents.I listened to Freakonomics a couple years back during a drive to and from a meeting in Rochester. Love the analogies.Cheers,g

    Karim Kanji said:
    November 25, 2009 at 4:05 pm

    You are MORE of the type of person who takes an emotional look at issues and people rather than an intellectual and scholarly take.You're smart like that.:)

    Faiza said:
    November 24, 2009 at 7:09 pm

    I'm a non-intellectual?What is your definition of an intellectual?:)Faiza

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